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J Lipid Res. 2014 Dec;55(12):2541-53. doi: 10.1194/jlr.M052308. Epub 2014 Sep 30.

A high-fat diet suppresses de novo lipogenesis and desaturation but not elongation and triglyceride synthesis in mice.

Author information

1
Advanced Imaging Research Center-Division of Metabolic Mechanisms of Disease, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX Center for Neurosciences and Cell Biology, Department of Zoology, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal.
2
Center for Neurosciences and Cell Biology, Department of Zoology, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal.
3
Advanced Imaging Research Center-Division of Metabolic Mechanisms of Disease, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX.
4
Department of Internal Medicine, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX.
5
Advanced Imaging Research Center-Division of Metabolic Mechanisms of Disease, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX Department of Internal Medicine, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX.
6
Advanced Imaging Research Center-Division of Metabolic Mechanisms of Disease, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX Department of Pharmacology, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX.

Abstract

Intracellular lipids and their synthesis contribute to the mechanisms and complications of obesity-associated diseases. We describe an NMR approach that provides an abbreviated lipidomic analysis with concurrent lipid biosynthetic fluxes. Following deuterated water administration, positional isotopomer analysis by deuterium NMR of specific lipid species was used to examine flux through de novo lipogenesis (DNL), FA elongation, desaturation, and TG-glycerol synthesis. The NMR method obviated certain assumptions regarding sites of enrichment and exchangeable hydrogens required by mass isotope methods. The approach was responsive to genetic and pharmacological gain or loss of function of DNL, elongation, desaturation, and glyceride synthesis. BDF1 mice consuming a high-fat diet (HFD) or matched low-fat diet for 35 weeks were examined across feeding periods to determine how flux through these pathways contributes to diet induced fatty liver and obesity. HFD mice had increased rates of FA elongation and glyceride synthesis. However DNL was markedly suppressed despite insulin resistance and obesity. We conclude that most hepatic TGs in the liver of HFD mice were formed from the reesterification of existing or ingested lipids, not DNL.

KEYWORDS:

adipose; lipid metabolism; lipidomics; liver; nuclear magnetic resonance; obesity

PMID:
25271296
PMCID:
PMC4242447
DOI:
10.1194/jlr.M052308
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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