Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Psychopharmacol. 2014 Nov;28(11):993-1000. doi: 10.1177/0269881114552713. Epub 2014 Sep 29.

Treating drug dependence with the aid of ibogaine: a retrospective study.

Author information

1
Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Departamento de Psiquiatria, Instituto Plantando Consciência, São Paulo, Brazil eduardoschenberg@gmail.com.
2
Instituto Plantando Consciência, São Paulo, Brazil.
3
M.P.P.G Hospital, Santa Cruz do Rio Pardo, Brazil.
4
Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Programa de Orientação e Atendimento a Dependentes (PROAD), Departamento de Psiquiatria, Instituto Plantando Consciência, São Paulo, Brazil.

Abstract

Ibogaine is an alkaloid purported to be an effective drug dependence treatment. However, its efficacy has been hard to evaluate, partly because it is illegal in some countries. In such places, treatments are conducted in underground settings where fatalities have occurred. In Brazil ibogaine is unregulated and a combined approach of psychotherapy and ibogaine is being practiced to treat addiction. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of ibogaine, we conducted a retrospective analysis of data from 75 previous alcohol, cannabis, cocaine and crack users (72% poly-drug users). We observed no serious adverse reactions or fatalities, and found 61% of participants abstinent. Participants treated with ibogaine only once reported abstinence for a median of 5.5 months and those treated multiple times for a median of 8.4 months. This increase was statistically significant (p < 0.001), and both single or multiple treatments led to longer abstinence periods than before the first ibogaine session (p < 0.001). These results suggest that the use of ibogaine supervised by a physician and accompanied by psychotherapy can facilitate prolonged periods of abstinence, without the occurrence of fatalities or complications. These results suggest that ibogaine can be a safe and effective treatment for dependence on stimulant and other non-opiate drugs.

KEYWORDS:

Ibogaine; addiction; cocaine; crack; dependence

PMID:
25271214
DOI:
10.1177/0269881114552713
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon
Loading ...
Support Center