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Respir Physiol Neurobiol. 2014 Dec 1;204:99-111. doi: 10.1016/j.resp.2014.09.013. Epub 2014 Sep 28.

Increased cardio-respiratory coupling evoked by slow deep breathing can persist in normal humans.

Author information

1
Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, United States; Department of Neurosciences, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, United States. Electronic address: ted3@case.edu.
2
Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, United States.
3
Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Physiology, Morsani College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, United States.
4
Department of Physiology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, United States.

Abstract

Slow deep breathing (SDB) has a therapeutic effect on autonomic tone. Our previous studies suggested that coupling of the cardiovascular to the respiratory system mediates plasticity expressed in sympathetic nerve activity. We hypothesized that SDB evokes short-term plasticity of cardiorespiratory coupling (CRC). We analyzed respiratory frequency (fR), heart rate and its variability (HR&HRV), the power spectral density (PSD) of blood pressure (BP) and the ventilatory pattern before, during, and after a 20-min epoch of SDB. During SDB, CRC and the relative PSD of BP at fR increased; mean arterial pressure decreased; but HR varied; increasing (n = 3), or decreasing (n = 2) or remaining the same (n = 5). After SDB, short-term plasticity was not apparent for the group but for individuals differences existed between baseline and recovery periods. We conclude that a repeated practice, like pranayama, may strengthen CRC and evoke short-term plasticity effectively in a subset of individuals.

KEYWORDS:

Neural control of heart rate; Neural control of respiration; Neural control of sympathetic nerve activity; Poincaré plots; Pranayama

PMID:
25266396
PMCID:
PMC4252616
DOI:
10.1016/j.resp.2014.09.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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