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Phytochemistry. 2015 Apr;112:54-62. doi: 10.1016/j.phytochem.2014.08.027. Epub 2014 Sep 25.

Reactive oxygen species and plant resistance to fungal pathogens.

Author information

1
Department of Biology, University of Fribourg, 10 chemin du Musée, CH-1700 Fribourg, Switzerland. Electronic address: silke.lehmann@unifr.ch.
2
Department of Biology, University of Fribourg, 10 chemin du Musée, CH-1700 Fribourg, Switzerland. Electronic address: marioalberto.serranoortega@unifr.ch.
3
Department of Biology, University of Fribourg, 10 chemin du Musée, CH-1700 Fribourg, Switzerland. Electronic address: floriane.lharidon@unifr.ch.
4
Laboratory of Plant Pathology, Department of Crop Science, Agricultural University of Athens, 75 Iera Odos, 118 55 Athens, Greece. Electronic address: sotiris@aua.gr.
5
Department of Biology, University of Fribourg, 10 chemin du Musée, CH-1700 Fribourg, Switzerland. Electronic address: jean-pierre.metraux@unifr.ch.

Abstract

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been studied for their role in plant development as well as in plant immunity. ROS were consistently observed to accumulate in the plant after the perception of pathogens and microbes and over the years, ROS were postulated to be an integral part of the defence response of the plant. In this article we will focus on recent findings about ROS involved in the interaction of plants with pathogenic fungi. We will describe the ways to detect ROS, their modes of action and their importance in relation to resistance to fungal pathogens. In addition we include some results from works focussing on the fungal interactor and from studies investigating roots during pathogen attack.

KEYWORDS:

Cell wall; Fungal pathogens; Innate immunity; Roots; Signalling

PMID:
25264341
DOI:
10.1016/j.phytochem.2014.08.027
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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