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J Card Surg. 2014 Nov;29(6):772-8. doi: 10.1111/jocs.12442. Epub 2014 Sep 29.

Sex-related differences in 2197 patients undergoing isolated surgical aortic valve replacement.

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1
Clinic for Cardiovascular Surgery, German Heart Centre, Munich, Germany.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The aim of this study is to evaluate gender-related differences in clinical presentation and mortality in patients undergoing isolated surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR).

METHODS:

We performed a retrospective analysis of all patients undergoing isolated SAVR from 2000 to 2011 in our center. Patient data were compared with regard to gender including baseline characteristics, 30-day, and late mortality. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were used to analyze long-term survival up to 10 years follow-up. Independent risk factors for 30-day and late mortality were identified using a Cox regression model.

RESULTS:

Two thousand one hundred ninety-seven patients were included, 1290 (58.7%) male patients and 907 (41.3%) female patients. Female patients were older (70 ± 11 vs. 64 ± 13 years, p < 0.001), presented with higher logistic EuroSCORE (7.5 ± 5.8 vs. 5.6 ± 6%, p = 0.006), and more common NYHA class III or IV (71 vs. 65%, p = 0.05). Male patients presented more often with LV dysfunction (7.5 vs. 2.8%, p < 0.001) and endocarditis (4.1 vs. 1.7%, p < 0.001) than female patients. Intraoperatively, female patients were more likely to have had a complete sternotomy (65 vs. 52%, p < 0.001) and SAVR with a bioprosthesis (87 vs. 78%, p < 0.001). Female patients exhibited a higher 30-day mortality (4.4 vs. 1.6%, p < 0.001) and late mortality (13 vs. 9.6%, p = 0.04) than male patients. After adjustment for baseline characteristics, only female gender was an independent predictor for 30-day mortality (HR 2.2, 95% CI 0.98 to 5.2, p = 0.05) and age as independent predictor for late mortality (HR 1.07, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.1, p < 0.001).

CONCLUSION:

Female patients were older and sicker and may therefore exhibit higher 30-day and late mortality than male patients. Female gender per se was a predictor for 30-day but not for late mortality.

PMID:
25264220
DOI:
10.1111/jocs.12442
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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