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Oncogene. 2015 Jul 23;34(30):3885-94. doi: 10.1038/onc.2014.326. Epub 2014 Sep 29.

Genetic alterations of protein tyrosine phosphatases in human cancers.

Author information

1
1] Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology and Shanghai Institution of Digestive Disease, Shanghai Jiao-Tong University School of Medicine Renji Hospital, Shanghai, China [2] Department of Genetics and Genome Sciences, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA [3] Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA.
2
1] Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA [2] Department of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA.
3
1] Department of Genetics and Genome Sciences, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA [2] Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA.

Abstract

Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are enzymes that remove phosphate from tyrosine residues in proteins. Recent whole-exome sequencing of human cancer genomes reveals that many PTPs are frequently mutated in a variety of cancers. Among these mutated PTPs, PTP receptor T (PTPRT) appears to be the most frequently mutated PTP in human cancers. Beside PTPN11, which functions as an oncogene in leukemia, genetic and functional studies indicate that most of mutant PTPs are tumor suppressor genes. Identification of the substrates and corresponding kinases of the mutant PTPs may provide novel therapeutic targets for cancers harboring these mutant PTPs.

PMID:
25263441
PMCID:
PMC4377308
DOI:
10.1038/onc.2014.326
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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