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Nucleic Acids Res. 2014 Oct 29;42(19):12212-23. doi: 10.1093/nar/gku891. Epub 2014 Sep 27.

Comparative RNA-Seq based dissection of the regulatory networks and environmental stimuli underlying Vibrio parahaemolyticus gene expression during infection.

Author information

1
The Broad Institute, Cambridge, MA, USA Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Microbiology and Immunobiology, Brigham & Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School and HHMI, 181 Longwood Ave., Boston, MA, USA livny@broadinstitute.org.
2
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Microbiology and Immunobiology, Brigham & Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School and HHMI, 181 Longwood Ave., Boston, MA, USA.
3
The Broad Institute, Cambridge, MA, USA Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Microbiology and Immunobiology, Brigham & Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School and HHMI, 181 Longwood Ave., Boston, MA, USA mwaldor@research.bwh.harvard.edu.

Abstract

Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the leading worldwide cause of seafood-associated gastroenteritis, yet little is known regarding its intraintestinal gene expression or physiology. To date, in vivo analyses have focused on identification and characterization of virulence factors--e.g. a crucial Type III secretion system (T3SS2)--rather than genome-wide analyses of in vivo biology. Here, we used RNA-Seq to profile V. parahaemolyticus gene expression in infected infant rabbits, which mimic human infection. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of V. parahaemolyticus isolated from rabbit intestines and from several laboratory conditions enabled identification of mRNAs and sRNAs induced during infection and of regulatory factors that likely control them. More than 12% of annotated V. parahaemolyticus genes are differentially expressed in the intestine, including the genes of T3SS2, which are likely induced by bile-mediated activation of the transcription factor VtrB. Our analyses also suggest that V. parahaemolyticus has access to glucose or other preferred carbon sources in vivo, but that iron is inconsistently available. The V. parahaemolyticus transcriptional response to in vivo growth is far more widespread than and largely distinct from that of V. cholerae, likely due to the distinct ways in which these diarrheal pathogens interact with and modulate the environment in the small intestine.

PMID:
25262354
PMCID:
PMC4231756
DOI:
10.1093/nar/gku891
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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