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FEBS Lett. 2014 Nov 3;588(21):3830-7. doi: 10.1016/j.febslet.2014.09.018. Epub 2014 Sep 26.

Arabidopsis STAYGREEN-LIKE (SGRL) promotes abiotic stress-induced leaf yellowing during vegetative growth.

Author information

1
Department of Plant Science, Plant Genomics and Breeding Institute, Research Institute of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: sakuraba0425@gmail.com.
2
Department of Plant Science, Plant Genomics and Breeding Institute, Research Institute of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921, Republic of Korea.
3
Institute of Plant Biology, University of Zurich, CH-8008 Zurich, Switzerland.
4
Department of Plant Science, Plant Genomics and Breeding Institute, Research Institute of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: ncpaek@snu.ac.kr.

Abstract

During leaf senescence in Arabidopsis, STAYGREEN 1 (SGR1) and SGR2 regulate chlorophyll degradation positively and negatively, respectively. SGR-LIKE (SGRL) is also expressed in pre-senescing leaves, but its function remains largely unknown. Here we show that under abiotic stress, Arabidopsis plants overexpressing SGRL exhibit early leaf yellowing and sgrl-1 mutants exhibit persistent green color of leaves. Under salt stress, SGR1 and SGRL act synergistically for rapid Chl degradation prior to senescence. Furthermore, SGRL forms homo- and heterodimers with SGR1 and SGR2 in vivo, and interacts with LHCII and chlorophyll catabolic enzymes. The role of SGRL under abiotic stress is discussed.

KEYWORDS:

Abiotic stress; Chlorophyll degradation; STAYGREEN; STAYGREEN-LIKE

PMID:
25261252
DOI:
10.1016/j.febslet.2014.09.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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