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J Hand Surg Am. 2014 Oct;39(10):1926-32. doi: 10.1016/j.jhsa.2014.07.041.

Readmissions after treatment of distal radius fractures.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, Palo Alto Veterans Hospital, Palo Alto, CA; Division of Plastic Surgery, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA; Division of General Surgery, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA. Electronic address: curtincatherine@yahoo.com.
2
Department of Surgery, Palo Alto Veterans Hospital, Palo Alto, CA; Division of Plastic Surgery, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA; Division of General Surgery, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To assess the rates and associated diagnoses of readmissions for patients having received an intervention for treatment of distal radius fracture.

METHODS:

We analyzed patient discharges from 2005-2011 for California, Florida, and New York. We used Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality data sets: (1) State Inpatient Database, (2) State Ambulatory Surgery Database, and (3) State Emergency Department Database. We examined inpatient, outpatient, and emergency room treatment locations. We identified patients by diagnosis code for distal radius fracture (813.41). Patients were stratified based on procedure codes for open reduction, closed reduction, and external fixation. The cohort was followed for 30 days to examine all-cause 30-day inpatient admissions and emergency department visits.

RESULTS:

We identified 35,241 discharges with a primary diagnosis of distal radius facture. Of those, 18,388 patients underwent a procedure for their fracture, and 1,679 (9%) were readmitted within 30 days of discharge. Readmission rates varied by procedure type: internal fixation 8%, closed reduction 14%, and external fixation 11%. The most common diagnosis codes associated with readmission were general distal radius fracture codes (11%) and pain diagnoses (10%). Open procedures had higher odds of having a readmission associated with pain compared with closed treatment and external fixation.

CONCLUSIONS:

Readmissions after treatment of distal radius fracture care are common. Our results show many distal radius fracture patients return to the health care system for pain-related issues. As more emphasis is placed on quality health care delivery, implementation of better pain management will be important to health care providers and patients.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE:

This study highlights that improved perioperative pain control may improve patient care and reduce readmissions.

KEYWORDS:

Colles fracture; distal radius fracture; postoperative pain; readmission

PMID:
25257486
DOI:
10.1016/j.jhsa.2014.07.041
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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