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Br J Psychiatry. 2014 Nov;205(5):376-82. doi: 10.1192/bjp.bp.113.137380. Epub 2014 Sep 25.

Default mode network subsystem alterations in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Author information

1
Jan C. Beucke, MS, Department of Psychology, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Berlin, Germany and Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA; Jorge Sepulcre, MD, PhD, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston and Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA; Mark C. Eldaief, MD, Department of Neurology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA; Miriam Sebold, MS, Department of Psychology, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin and Emotional Neuroscience Group, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany; Norbert Kathmann, PhD, Department of Psychology, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Berlin, Germany; Christian Kaufmann, MS, Department of Psychology, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Berlin, Germany.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Although neurobiological models of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) traditionally emphasise the central role of corticostriatal brain regions, studies of default mode network integrity have garnered increasing interest, but have produced conflicting results.

AIMS:

To resolve these discrepant findings by examining the integrity of default mode network subsystems in OCD.

METHOD:

Comparison of seed-based resting-state functional connectivity of 11 default mode network components between 46 patients with OCD and 46 controls using functional magnetic resonance imaging.

RESULTS:

Significantly reduced connectivity within the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex self subsystem was identified in the OCD group, and remained significant after controlling for medication status and life-time history of affective disorders. Further, greater connectivity between the self subsystem and salience and attention networks was observed.

CONCLUSIONS:

Results indicate that people with OCD show abnormalities in a neural system previously associated with self-referential processing in healthy individuals, and suggest the need for examination of dynamic interactions between this default mode network subsystem and other large-scale networks in this disorder.

PMID:
25257066
DOI:
10.1192/bjp.bp.113.137380
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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