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Curr Opin Pharmacol. 2014 Oct;18:56-60. doi: 10.1016/j.coph.2014.09.006. Epub 2014 Sep 23.

Update on the antibiotic resistance crisis.

Author information

1
Department of Medical Biotechnologies, University of Siena, I-53100 Siena, Italy; Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, University of Florence, I-50134 Florence, Italy; Clinical Microbiology and Virology Unit, Florence Careggi University Hospital, I-50134 Florence, Italy. Electronic address: gianmaria.rossolini@unifi.it.
2
Department of Medical Biotechnologies, University of Siena, I-53100 Siena, Italy.
3
Clinical Microbiology and Virology Unit, Florence Careggi University Hospital, I-50134 Florence, Italy.

Abstract

Antibiotics tend to lose their efficacy over time due to the emergence and dissemination of resistance among bacterial pathogens. Strains with resistance to multiple antibiotic classes have emerged among major Gram-positive and Gram-negative species including Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter spp. Enterobacteriaceae, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. With some Gram-negatives, resistance may involve most or even all the available antimicrobial options, resulting in extremely drug-resistant or totally drug-resistant phenotypes. This so-called 'antibiotic resistance crisis' has been compounded by the lagging in antibiotic discovery and development programs occurred in recent years, and is jeopardizing the essential role played by antibiotics in current medical practices.

PMID:
25254623
DOI:
10.1016/j.coph.2014.09.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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