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J Clin Microbiol. 2014 Dec;52(12):4217-23. doi: 10.1128/JCM.01967-14. Epub 2014 Sep 24.

Severity-related changes of bronchial microbiome in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Author information

1
Fundació Parc Taulí, Sabadell/Badalona, Spain CIBER de Enfermedades Respiratorias (CIBERES), Bunyola, Spain Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Esfera (UAB), Barcelona, Spain Fundació Institut d'Investigació Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona, Spain mgarcianu@tauli.cat.
2
Fundació Parc Taulí, Sabadell/Badalona, Spain CIBER de Enfermedades Respiratorias (CIBERES), Bunyola, Spain Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Esfera (UAB), Barcelona, Spain Fundació Institut d'Investigació Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona, Spain.
3
Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Esfera (UAB), Barcelona, Spain Department of Respiratory Medicine, Hospital Universitari Parc Taulí, Sabadell, Spain.
4
Genomics and Health Area, Centro Superior de Investigación en Salud Pública- Fundación para el Fomento de la Investigación Sanitaria y Biomédica de la Comunidad Valenciana (CSISP-FISABIO), Valencia, Spain CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain Department of Genetics, Institut Cavanilles de Biodiversitat i Biologia Evolutiva (ICBiBE), Universitat de València, Valencia, Spain.
5
Department of Microbiology, Hospital Universitari Parc Taulí, Sabadell, Spain.
6
Fundació Parc Taulí, Sabadell/Badalona, Spain CIBER de Enfermedades Respiratorias (CIBERES), Bunyola, Spain Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Esfera (UAB), Barcelona, Spain Department of Respiratory Medicine, Hospital Universitari Parc Taulí, Sabadell, Spain.

Abstract

Bronchial colonization by potentially pathogenic microorganisms (PPMs) is often demonstrated in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but culture-based techniques identify only a portion of the bacteria in mucosal surfaces. The aim of the study was to determine changes in the bronchial microbiome of COPD associated with the severity of the disease. The bronchial microbiome of COPD patients was analyzed by 16S rRNA gene amplification and pyrosequencing in sputum samples obtained during stable disease. Seventeen COPD patients were studied (forced expiratory volume in the first second expressed as a percentage of the forced vital capacity [FEV1%] median, 35.0%; interquartile range [IQR], 31.5 to 52.0), providing a mean of 4,493 (standard deviation [SD], 2,598) sequences corresponding to 47 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) (SD, 17) at a 97% identity level. Patients were dichotomized according to their lung function as moderate to severe when their FEV1% values were over the median and as advanced when FEV1% values were lower. The most prevalent phyla in sputum were Proteobacteria (44%) and Firmicutes (16%), followed by Actinobacteria (13%). A greater microbial diversity was found in patients with moderate-to-severe disease, and alpha diversity showed a statistically significant decrease in patients with advanced disease when assessed by Shannon (ρ = 0.528; P = 0.029, Spearman correlation coefficient) and Chao1 (ρ = 0.53; P = 0.028, Spearman correlation coefficient) alpha-diversity indexes. The higher severity that characterizes advanced COPD is paralleled by a decrease in the diversity of the bronchial microbiome, with a loss of part of the resident flora that is replaced by a more restricted microbiota that includes PPMs.

PMID:
25253795
PMCID:
PMC4313290
DOI:
10.1128/JCM.01967-14
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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