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J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci. 2015 Nov;70(6):981-94. doi: 10.1093/geronb/gbu136. Epub 2014 Sep 23.

Receiving Instrumental Support in Late Parent-Child Relationships and Parental Depression.

Author information

1
Department of Sociology, Interuniversity Center for Social Science Theory and Methodology, University of Groningen, The Netherlands. m.djundeva@rug.nl.
2
Department of Sociology, Nuffield College, University of Oxford, United Kingdom.
3
Department of Sociology, Interuniversity Center for Social Science Theory and Methodology, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
4
Department of Sociology, Interuniversity Center for Social Science Theory and Methodology, University of Groningen, The Netherlands. Department of Health Sciences, Health Psychology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This study investigates the role of gender, functional limitations, and social interaction in the association between instrumental support from adult children and parental depression. We apply self-determination theory to hypothesize about the role of physical needs and social resources on parental depression in a European context.

METHOD:

A sample of 6,268 parents older than 65 who have nonresident children from the first wave of Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (2004) is analyzed. We estimate logistic regression models to test for the association between instrumental support and depression. Physical needs, gender, and social interaction are used as moderators.

RESULTS:

Net of core factors that contribute to depression, including previous history of depression, there is a U-shaped pattern between receiving instrumental support and depression that persists across country regimes. For respondents with medium physical limitations, too little or too frequent support from children is associated with higher depression. For respondents with severe limitations, receiving at least some support is better than receiving none at all. The receipt of too frequent support from children increases the level of depression more for women than men. All interaction effects are comparable across country regimes.

DISCUSSION:

Heterogeneity in physical needs and resources of older individuals must be taken into account when assessing the effects of instrumental support on mental health.

KEYWORDS:

Aging; Depression; Instrumental support; Intergenerational solidarity; Mental health

PMID:
25253024
PMCID:
PMC4794614
DOI:
10.1093/geronb/gbu136
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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