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PLoS One. 2014 Sep 24;9(9):e108210. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0108210. eCollection 2014.

Associations between acetaminophen use during pregnancy and ADHD symptoms measured at ages 7 and 11 years.

Author information

1
Department of Paediatrics, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
2
School of Psychology, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
3
Discipline of Nutrition, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
4
Department of Medicine, The University of Auckland, Auckland New Zealand.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Our aim was to replicate and extend the recently found association between acetaminophen use during pregnancy and ADHD symptoms in school-age children.

METHODS:

Participants were members of the Auckland Birthweight Collaborative Study, a longitudinal study of 871 infants of European descent sampled disproportionately for small for gestational age. Drug use during pregnancy (acetaminophen, aspirin, antacids, and antibiotics) were analysed in relation to behavioural difficulties and ADHD symptoms measured by parent report at age 7 and both parent- and child-report at 11 years of age. The analyses included multiple covariates including birthweight, socioeconomic status and antenatal maternal perceived stress.

RESULTS:

Acetaminophen was used by 49.8% of the study mothers during pregnancy. We found significantly higher total difficulty scores (Strengths and Difficulty Questionnaire parent report at age 7 and child report at age 11) if acetaminophen was used during pregnancy, but there were no significant differences associated with any of the other drugs. Children of mothers who used acetaminophen during pregnancy were also at increased risk of ADHD at 7 and 11 years of age (Conners' Parent Rating Scale-Revised).

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings strengthen the contention that acetaminophen exposure in pregnancy increases the risk of ADHD-like behaviours. Our study also supports earlier claims that findings are specific to acetaminophen.

PMID:
25251831
PMCID:
PMC4177119
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0108210
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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