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Annu Rev Psychol. 2015 Jan 3;66:115-42. doi: 10.1146/annurev-psych-010814-015031. Epub 2014 Sep 19.

The cognitive neuroscience of working memory.

Author information

  • 1Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute and Department of Psychology, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720; email: despo@berkeley.edu.

Abstract

For more than 50 years, psychologists and neuroscientists have recognized the importance of a working memory to coordinate processing when multiple goals are active and to guide behavior with information that is not present in the immediate environment. In recent years, psychological theory and cognitive neuroscience data have converged on the idea that information is encoded into working memory by allocating attention to internal representations, whether semantic long-term memory (e.g., letters, digits, words), sensory, or motoric. Thus, information-based multivariate analyses of human functional MRI data typically find evidence for the temporary representation of stimuli in regions that also process this information in nonworking memory contexts. The prefrontal cortex (PFC), on the other hand, exerts control over behavior by biasing the salience of mnemonic representations and adjudicating among competing, context-dependent rules. The "control of the controller" emerges from a complex interplay between PFC and striatal circuits and ascending dopaminergic neuromodulatory signals.

KEYWORDS:

cognitive control; connectivity; dopamine; prefrontal cortex; short-term memory; top-down; working memory

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