Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Nephrology (Carlton). 2014 Dec;19(12):791-7. doi: 10.1111/nep.12343.

Associations of sugar-sweetened and artificially sweetened soda with chronic kidney disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Author information

1
Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES:

The risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in patients who regularly drink soda is controversial. The objective of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the associations between consumption of sugar-sweetened and artificially sweetened soda and CKD.

METHODS:

A literature search was performed using MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from inception until 30 June 2014. Studies that reported odds ratios or hazard ratios comparing the risk of CKD in patients consuming significant amounts of either sugar-sweetened or artificially sweetened soda versus those who did not consume soda were included. Pooled risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using a random-effects, generic inverse variance method.

RESULTS:

Five studies were included in our analysis of the association between consumption of sugar-sweetened soda and CKD. The pooled RR of CKD in patients consuming sugar-sweetened soda was 1.58 (95% CI 1.00-2.49). Four studies were selected to assess the association between consumption of artificially sweetened soda and CKD. The pooled RR of CKD in patients consuming artificially sweetened soda was 1.33 (95% CI 0.82-2.15).

CONCLUSIONS:

Our study demonstrates statistically significant increased risks of CKD in patients consuming sugar-sweetened soda, but not in patients consuming artificially sweetened soda. This finding suggests that sugar-sweetened soda consumption is associated with CKD and may impact clinical management and primary prevention of CKD in high-risk patients.

KEYWORDS:

carbonated beverages; chronic kidney disease; soda; soft drink

PMID:
25251417
DOI:
10.1111/nep.12343
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center