Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Expert Opin Drug Deliv. 2015 Mar;12(3):415-40. doi: 10.1517/17425247.2015.961420. Epub 2014 Sep 24.

Long-term delivery of protein therapeutics.

Author information

1
University of Missouri-Kansas City, Pharmaceutical Sciences , Kansas City, MO , USA mitraa@umkc.edu.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Proteins are effective biotherapeutics with applications in diverse ailments. Despite being specific and potent, their full clinical potential has not yet been realized. This can be attributed to short half-lives, complex structures, poor in vivo stability, low permeability, frequent parenteral administrations and poor adherence to treatment in chronic diseases. A sustained release system, providing controlled release of proteins, may overcome many of these limitations.

AREAS COVERED:

This review focuses on recent development in approaches, especially polymer-based formulations, which can provide therapeutic levels of proteins over extended periods. Advances in particulate, gel-based formulations and novel approaches for extended protein delivery are discussed. Emphasis is placed on dosage form, method of preparation, mechanism of release and stability of biotherapeutics.

EXPERT OPINION:

Substantial advancements have been made in the field of extended protein delivery via various polymer-based formulations over last decade despite the unique delivery-related challenges posed by protein biologics. A number of injectable sustained-release formulations have reached market. However, therapeutic application of proteins is still hampered by delivery-related issues. A large number of protein molecules are under clinical trials, and hence, there is an urgent need to develop new methods to deliver these highly potent biologics.

KEYWORDS:

formulation; hydrogel; implant; microparticle; nanoparticle; protein delivery; release mechanism; stability; sustained release; thermosensitive gel

PMID:
25251334
PMCID:
PMC4605535
DOI:
10.1517/17425247.2015.961420
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Taylor & Francis Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center