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NeuroRehabilitation. 2014;35(3):579-85. doi: 10.3233/NRE-141153.

Effects of self-action observation on standing balance learning: A change of brain activity detected using functional near-infrared spectroscopy.

Author information

1
Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Health Science, Kio University, Nara, Japan Neurorehabilitation Research Center, Kio University, Nara, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Studies suggest that the observation of others' actions leads to enhanced motor skill learning.

OBJECTIVE:

We examined whether others' or self-action observation is effective for standing balance learning. In addition, we examined cortical activation during action observation using functional near-infrared spectroscopy.

METHODS:

Thirty-nine healthy young subjects were assigned randomly to the Control, Other-Observation (O-O), and Self-Observation (S-O) groups. The subjects learned to stand on a tilting platform while maintaining a horizontal position. The Control group alternated each trial with a rest period. The O-O and S-O groups were provided with information related to their performance during the rest period: the O-O group observed another person, while the S-O group observed their previous performance. Cortical activation was assessed by changes of hemoglobin oxygenation (oxyHb).

RESULTS:

A 2-way analysis of variance with repeated measures on balance performance revealed a significant difference in post-training (p < 0.05) and retention (p < 0.01) only in the S-O group. And an increase of oxyHb levels at post-training in the S-O group was observed in the supplementary motor area.

CONCLUSION:

Self-action observation improved standing balance and brain activity during training and at 24 h after training.

KEYWORDS:

Action observation; balance; fNIRS; motor learning

PMID:
25248448
DOI:
10.3233/NRE-141153
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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