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PLoS One. 2014 Sep 23;9(9):e108574. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0108574. eCollection 2014.

Factors related to executive dysfunction after acute infarct.

Author information

1
Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China.
2
Department of Neurology, Guangzhou First People's Hospital, Guangzhou Medical College, Guangzhou, China.

Abstract

AIM:

The aim of this study was to investigate the association of infarct location with post-stroke executive dysfunction.

METHODS:

One hundred seventy-seven patients hospitalized with acute infarction were enrolled. General information and NIHSS score at admission were recorded. The infarct site was recorded from magnetic resonance T2-W1 and FLAIR images, and the extent of white matter disease was assessed using the Fazekas score. Seven days after symptoms, executive function was assessed using the validated Chinese version of Mattis Dementia Rating Scale (MDRS) Initiation/Perseveration (I/P) [MDRS I/P].

RESULTS:

The average MDRS I/P score of the 177 infarction patients was 24.16 ± 5.21, considerably lower than the average score (32.7 ± 3.1) of a control group of normal individuals. Patients with infarcts in the corona radiata or basal ganglia had significantly lower MDRS I/P scores that those without infarcts at these locations. The number of infarcts in the basal ganglia was also significantly associated with low MDRS I/P scores. Male gender and low NIHSS score were significantly associated with low MDRS I/P score, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was significantly associated with high MDRS I/P score. The number of infarcts in areas other than the basal ganglia as well as corona radiata and the extent of white matter disease had no influence on this score.

CONCLUSIONS:

The number of infarcts in the basal ganglia corona radiata, low NIHSS score, and male gender are significantly and independently related to poor executive function (that is, low MDRS I/P score) after acute infarct.

PMID:
25247604
PMCID:
PMC4172700
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0108574
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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