Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Biology (Basel). 2014 Sep 22;3(3):606-22. doi: 10.3390/biology3030606.

Discerning primary and secondary factors responsible for clinical fatigue in multisystem diseases.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular Physiology & Biophysics, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405, USA. dmaughan@uvm.edu.
2
Department of Molecular Physiology & Biophysics, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405, USA. mtoth@uvm.edu.

Abstract

Fatigue is a common symptom of numerous acute and chronic diseases, including myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome, multiple sclerosis, heart failure, cancer, and many others. In these multi-system diseases the physiological determinants of enhanced fatigue encompass a combination of metabolic, neurological, and myofibrillar adaptations. Previous research studies have focused on adaptations specific to skeletal muscle and their role in fatigue. However, most have neglected the contribution of physical inactivity in assessing disease syndromes, which, through deconditioning, likely contributes to symptomatic fatigue. In this commentary, we briefly review disease-related muscle phenotypes in the context of whether they relate to the primary disease or whether they develop secondary to reduced physical activity. Knowledge of the etiology of the skeletal muscle adaptations in these conditions and their contribution to fatigue symptoms is important for understanding the utility of exercise rehabilitation as an intervention to alleviate the physiological precipitants of fatigue.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI) Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center