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Korean J Parasitol. 2014 Aug;52(4):391-7. doi: 10.3347/kjp.2014.52.4.391. Epub 2014 Aug 29.

Prevalence and risk factors of clonorchiasis among residents of riverside areas in Muju-gun, Jeollabuk-do, Korea.

Author information

1
Graduate School of Public Health, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 301-131, Korea.
2
Department of Infection Biology, School of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 301-131, Korea.
3
Division of Malaria and Parasitic Diseases, Korea National Institute of Health, Osong 363-951, Korea.
4
Department of Nursing, Soonchunhyang University, Chonan 330-090, Korea.

Abstract

We evaluated the status of Clonorchis sinensis infection and potential risk factors among residents of riverside areas (Geumgang) in Muju-gun, Jeollabuk-do (Province), Korea. From January to February 2010, a total of 349 (171 males, 178 females) stool samples were collected and examined by the formalin-ether concentration technique. Also, village residents were interviewed using questionnaires to obtain information about C. sinensis infection-related risk factors. Overall egg-positive rate of C. sinensis was 13.2%. Egg-positive rates were significantly higher in males, farmers, and residents who had lived there more than 20 years, and in residents who had eaten raw freshwater fish than in opposite groups, respectively. However, there was no significant difference between age groups, education levels, cigarette smoking, alcohol drinking, health status, past history of infection, and experience of clonorchiasis medication and examination. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine risk factors for clonorchiasis. On univariate analysis, the odds ratios for males, farmers, those who had lived there more than 20 years, and who had eaten raw freshwater fish were 2.41, 4.44, 3.16, and 4.88 times higher than those of the opposites, respectively. On multivariate analysis, the odds ratio of residents who had eaten raw freshwater fish was 3.2-fold higher than that of those who had not. These results indicate that residents living in Muju-gun, along the Geum River, Korea, have relatively high C. sinensis egg-positive rates, and the habit of eating raw freshwater fish was the major factor for the maintenance of clonorchiasis.

KEYWORDS:

Clonorchis sinensis; Geum River basin; prevalence; risk factor

PMID:
25246718
PMCID:
PMC4170035
DOI:
10.3347/kjp.2014.52.4.391
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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