Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2014 Dec;58(12):7240-9. doi: 10.1128/AAC.03320-14. Epub 2014 Sep 22.

Genotypic and phenotypic profiles of Escherichia coli isolates belonging to clinical sequence type 131 (ST131), clinical non-ST131, and fecal non-ST131 lineages from India.

Author information

1
Pathogen Biology Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology and Bioinformatics, University of Hyderabad, Gachibowli, Hyderabad, India.
2
Department of Microbiology, D. Y. Patil University, Pimpri, Pune, India.
3
Pathogen Biology Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology and Bioinformatics, University of Hyderabad, Gachibowli, Hyderabad, India Institute of Biological Sciences, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia niyaz.ahmed@uohyd.ac.in.

Abstract

In view of the epidemiological success of CTX-M-15-producing lineages of Escherichia coli and particularly of sequence type 131 (ST131), it is of significant interest to explore its prevalence in countries such as India and to determine if antibiotic resistance, virulence, metabolic potential, and/or the genetic architecture of the ST131 isolates differ from those of non-ST131 isolates. A collection of 126 E. coli isolates comprising 43 ST131 E. coli, 40 non-ST131 E. coli, and 43 fecal E. coli isolates collected from a tertiary care hospital in India was analyzed. These isolates were subjected to enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC)-based fingerprinting, O typing, phylogenetic grouping, antibiotic sensitivity testing, and virulence and antimicrobial resistance gene (VAG) detection. Representative isolates from this collection were also analyzed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), conjugation, metabolic profiling, biofilm production assay, and zebra fish lethality assay. All of the 43 ST131 E. coli isolates were exclusively associated with phylogenetic group B2 (100%), while most of the clinical non-ST131 and stool non-ST131 E. coli isolates were affiliated with the B2 (38%) and A (58%) phylogenetic groups, respectively. Significantly greater proportions of ST131 isolates (58%) than non-ST131 isolates (clinical and stool E. coli isolates, 5% each) were technically identified to be extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC). The clinical ST131, clinical non-ST131, and stool non-ST131 E. coli isolates exhibited high rates of multidrug resistance (95%, 91%, and 91%, respectively), extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL) production (86%, 83%, and 91%, respectively), and metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) production (28%, 33%, and 0%, respectively). CTX-M-15 was strongly linked with ESBL production in ST131 isolates (93%), whereas CTX-M-15 plus TEM were present in clinical and stool non-ST131 E. coli isolates. Using MLST, we confirmed the presence of two NDM-1-positive ST131 E. coli isolates. The aggregate bioscores (metabolite utilization) for ST131, clinical non-ST131, and stool non-ST131 E. coli isolates were 53%, 52%, and 49%, respectively. The ST131 isolates were moderate biofilm producers and were more highly virulent in zebra fish than non-ST131 isolates. According to ERIC-based fingerprinting, the ST131 strains were more genetically similar, and this was subsequently followed by the genetic similarity of clinical non-ST131 and stool non-ST131 E. coli strains. In conclusion, our data provide novel insights into aspects of the fitness advantage of E. coli lineage ST131 and suggest that a number of factors are likely involved in the worldwide dissemination of and infections due to ST131 E. coli isolates.

PMID:
25246402
PMCID:
PMC4249578
DOI:
10.1128/AAC.03320-14
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center