Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Int J Infect Dis. 2014 Nov;28:41-4. doi: 10.1016/j.ijid.2014.07.028. Epub 2014 Sep 19.

Maternal transmission risk and antibody levels against hepatitis B virus e antigen in pregnant women.

Author information

1
State Key Laboratory of Molecular Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing 100021, China; Qidong Liver Cancer Institute and Qidong People's Hospital, Qidong 226200, Jiangsu Province, China.
2
Qidong Liver Cancer Institute and Qidong People's Hospital, Qidong 226200, Jiangsu Province, China.
3
Beijing Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.
4
State Key Laboratory of Molecular Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing 100021, China.
5
National Office for Cancer Prevention and Control, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, China.
6
Department of Infectious Disease, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
7
Qidong Liver Cancer Institute and Qidong People's Hospital, Qidong 226200, Jiangsu Province, China. Electronic address: qdmjgliqin@163.com.
8
State Key Laboratory of Molecular Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing 100021, China. Electronic address: quchf@cicams.ac.cn.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The generation of antibodies (anti-HBe) against hepatitis B virus (HBV) e antigen (HBeAg) often coincides with clinical remission in chronic HBV patients. We aimed to examine the effect of maternal anti-HBe in protection against HBV mother-to-child transmission (MTCT).

METHODS:

A total of 140 chronic HBV-infected pregnant women participated in this study. Before delivery, maternal HBV serological markers and HBV viral load were determined and anti-HBe titers were semi-quantified. Neonatal hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and HBV-DNA status were determined from cord blood. The children were followed to age 1-3 years.

RESULTS:

The HBV-DNA positive rate in cord blood was 75.61% (31/41) in those who were born to mothers with serum HBV-DNA >10(6) IU/ml, which was significantly higher than in those who were born to mothers with HBV-DNA <10(6) IU/ml (3/99, 3.03%; p<0.0001). However, 10 newborns from mothers with serum HBV-DNA >10(6) IU/ml had no detectable HBV-DNA in cord blood; anti-HBe was positive with a median titer of 10 (interquartile range 10-55). A total of 84 children who received hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIG) within 12h after birth and who completed three doses of recombinant HBV vaccination were followed to age 1-3 years (up to May 2014). All 56 children who were born to mothers with serum HBV-DNA levels <10(6) IU/ml were HBsAg-negative. Five of the 22 children born to anti-HBe-negative mothers with serum HBV-DNA >10(6) IU/ml acquired an HBsAg-positive status. However, none of the six children who were born to anti-HBe-positive/weak-positive mothers with serum HBV-DNA >10(6) IU/ml acquired an HBsAg-positive status.

CONCLUSIONS:

The presence of maternal anti-HBe is protective against HBV MTCT, independent of the maternal serum HBV viral load.

KEYWORDS:

Antibodies against HBeAg; Hepatitis B virus; Mother-to-child transmission

PMID:
25245000
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijid.2014.07.028
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center