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J Phys Act Health. 2015 Aug;12(8):1045-51. doi: 10.1123/jpah.2014-0141. Epub 2014 Sep 22.

Reliability of the Pictorial Scale of Perceived Movement Skill Competence in 2 Diverse Samples of Young Children.

Author information

1
Faculty of Health, Deakin University, Burwood, Victoria, Australia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The purpose was to determine the reliability of an instrument designed to assess young children's perceived movement skill competence in 2 diverse samples.

METHODS:

A pictorial instrument assessed 12 perceived Fundamental Movement Skills (FMS) based on the Test of Gross Motor Development 2nd edition. Intra-Class Correlations (ICC) and internal consistency analyses were conducted. Paired sample t tests assessed change in mean perceived skill scores. Bivariate correlations between the intertrial difference and the mean of the trials explored proportional bias.

RESULTS:

Sample 1 (S1) were culturally diverse Australian children (n = 111; 52% boys) aged 5 to 8 years (mean = 6.4, SD = 1.0) with educated parents. Sample 2 (S2) were racially diverse and socioeconomically disadvantaged American children (n = 110; 57% boys) aged 5 to 10 years (mean = 6.8, SD = 1.1). For all children, the internal consistency for 12 FMS was acceptable (S1 = 0.72, 0.75, S2 = 0.66, 0.67). ICCs were higher in S1 (0.73) than S2 (0.50). Mean changes between trials were small. There was little evidence of proportional bias.

CONCLUSION:

Lower values in S2 may be due to differences in study demographic and execution. While the instrument demonstrated reliability/internal consistency, further work is recommended in diverse samples.

PMID:
25243542
DOI:
10.1123/jpah.2014-0141
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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