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Pediatr Clin North Am. 2014 Oct;61(5):889-905. doi: 10.1016/j.pcl.2014.06.010. Epub 2014 Aug 12.

Bringing back the social history.

Author information

1
Division of Emergency Medicine, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, 225 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611, USA; Department of Pediatrics, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL 60614, USA. Electronic address: MPierce@luriechildrens.org.
2
Division of Emergency Medicine, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, 225 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611, USA.
3
Richard H. Calica Center for Innovation in Children and Family Services, Juvenile Protective Association, Chicago, IL 60614, USA.

Abstract

The social environment of a child is a key determinant of the child's current and future health. Factors in a child's family environment, both protective and harmful, have a profound impact on a child's long-term health, brain development, and mortality. The social history may be the best all-around tool available for promoting a child's future health and well-being. It is a key first step in identifying social needs of a child and family so that they may benefit from intervention. This article focuses on key social history elements known to increase a child's risk of maltreatment and provides case examples.

KEYWORDS:

Adverse childhood experiences; Child maltreatment; Negative attributions; Psychosocial risk factors; Toxic stress

PMID:
25242704
PMCID:
PMC4171692
DOI:
10.1016/j.pcl.2014.06.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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