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Nat Nanotechnol. 2014 Oct;9(10):858-66. doi: 10.1038/nnano.2014.199. Epub 2014 Sep 21.

Strong underwater adhesives made by self-assembling multi-protein nanofibres.

Author information

1
1] Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307, USA [2] Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307, USA [3] Synthetic Biology Group, Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307, USA.
2
1] Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307, USA [2] Computational and Systems Biology Initiative, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307, USA.
3
1] Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307, USA [2] Synthetic Biology Group, Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307, USA.
4
1] Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307, USA [2] Computational and Systems Biology Initiative, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307, USA [3] The Institute of Medical Engineering and Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307, USA.
5
1] Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307, USA [2] Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307, USA [3] Synthetic Biology Group, Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307, USA [4] Computational and Systems Biology Initiative, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307, USA.

Abstract

Many natural underwater adhesives harness hierarchically assembled amyloid nanostructures to achieve strong and robust interfacial adhesion under dynamic and turbulent environments. Despite recent advances, our understanding of the molecular design, self-assembly and structure-function relationships of these natural amyloid fibres remains limited. Thus, designing biomimetic amyloid-based adhesives remains challenging. Here, we report strong and multi-functional underwater adhesives obtained from fusing mussel foot proteins (Mfps) of Mytilus galloprovincialis with CsgA proteins, the major subunit of Escherichia coli amyloid curli fibres. These hybrid molecular materials hierarchically self-assemble into higher-order structures, in which, according to molecular dynamics simulations, disordered adhesive Mfp domains are exposed on the exterior of amyloid cores formed by CsgA. Our fibres have an underwater adhesion energy approaching 20.9 mJ m(-2), which is 1.5 times greater than the maximum of bio-inspired and bio-derived protein-based underwater adhesives reported thus far. Moreover, they outperform Mfps or curli fibres taken on their own and exhibit better tolerance to auto-oxidation than Mfps at pH ≥ 7.0.

PMID:
25240674
PMCID:
PMC4191913
DOI:
10.1038/nnano.2014.199
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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