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FEBS Lett. 2014 Nov 3;588(21):3918-23. doi: 10.1016/j.febslet.2014.09.003. Epub 2014 Sep 19.

Choline but not its derivative betaine blocks slow vacuolar channels in the halophyte Chenopodium quinoa: implications for salinity stress responses.

Author information

1
Centro de Investigaciones Biomédicas, Universidad de Colima, Mexico. Electronic address: pottosin@ucol.mx.
2
Centro de Investigaciones Biomédicas, Universidad de Colima, Mexico; School of Land and Food, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 54, Hobart, Tas 7001, Australia.
3
School of Land and Food, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 54, Hobart, Tas 7001, Australia.

Abstract

Activity of tonoplast slow vacuolar (SV, or TPC1) channels has to be under a tight control, to avoid undesirable leak of cations stored in the vacuole. This is particularly important for salt-grown plants, to ensure efficient vacuolar Na(+) sequestration. In this study we show that choline, a cationic precursor of glycine betaine, efficiently blocks SV channels in leaf and root vacuoles of the two chenopods, Chenopodium quinoa (halophyte) and Beta vulgaris (glycophyte). At the same time, betaine and proline, two major cytosolic organic osmolytes, have no significant effect on SV channel activity. Physiological implications of these findings are discussed.

KEYWORDS:

Adaptation; Choline; Glycine betaine; Proline; SV channel; Salinity stress

PMID:
25240200
DOI:
10.1016/j.febslet.2014.09.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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