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J Dent. 2015 Feb;43(2):269-78. doi: 10.1016/j.jdent.2014.09.003. Epub 2014 Sep 18.

Deviations of inorganic and organic carbon content in hypomineralised enamel.

Author information

1
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. Electronic address: fabian.taube@amm.gu.se.
2
Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
3
Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Institute of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The purpose of this study was to discriminate hypomineralised enamel of permanent first molars from normal enamel by means of spectroscopic methods.

METHODS:

The present study was conducted using Multi spot Raman Fourier Transform Spectroscopy, Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD).

RESULTS:

Raman spectroscopy indicated significantly more B-type carbonate and hydrocarbons in hypomineralised enamel diagnosed as MIH (Molar Incisor Hypomineralisation). From XRD analysis, no changes in crystallinity of the enamel apatite could be found.

CONCLUSIONS:

Using multi spot Raman-spectroscopy, a significant molecular discrimination between normal and hypomineralised enamel could be made.

CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE:

Detailed surface studies are needed in order to achieve better restorative materials, specifically designed for restoration of hypomineralised enamel, and are also needed in order to understand and predict the clinical consequences of hypomineralised enamel with the condition MIH.

KEYWORDS:

Enamel; FT-Raman; FTIR; HME; Hypomineralised; MIH; SEM; XRD

PMID:
25239769
DOI:
10.1016/j.jdent.2014.09.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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