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NeuroRehabilitation. 2014;35(3):481-4. doi: 10.3233/NRE-141140.

EEG Neurofeedback therapy: Can it attenuate brain changes in TBI?

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Neurosciences, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS), Bangalore, India.
2
Department of Clinical Psychology, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS), Bangalore, India.
3
Department of Neurosurgery, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS), Bangalore, India.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Electroencephalogram Neurofeedback therapy (EEG-NFT) has several potential beneficial effects in terms of improving cognition and electrophysiological regulation among patients with brain injury. However, in vivo structural and functional changes remain less explored.

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of the present study is to explore EEG-NFT induced in vivo changes in traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients.

METHOD:

Two patients with mean age of 15 years with moderate head injury who had more than seven post concussion symptoms and poor cognitive performances (<5 percentile) were subjected to 20 sessions of EEG-NFT. The neuropsychological test scores, post concussion symptoms and MRI scan of the brain were recorded pre-post to EEG-NFT.

RESULTS:

During EEG-NFT the cognitive scores and concussion symptoms improved significantly (p < 0.05). The EEG-NFT has shown significant increase in cortical grey matter (GM) volumes (p < 0.0001) and fractional anisotropy (FA) of cortical white matter (WM) tracts (p < 0.0001, voxel max 60 and above). There was a significant decrease in global, local efficiency, cost and clustering coefficient of functional connectivity (Wilcoxon Sign Rank Test p < 0.05). Interestingly there was a significant increase in thalamo-cortical connection (increase FA value) after EEG-NFT.

CONCLUSION:

The EEG-NFT therapy has shown significant changes in structural and functional connectivity among young moderately injured TBI patients.

KEYWORDS:

EEG-NFT; MRI scan; TBI; in vivo changes; neuropsychological scores

PMID:
25238859
DOI:
10.3233/NRE-141140
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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