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Immunity. 2014 Sep 18;41(3):493-502. doi: 10.1016/j.immuni.2014.08.014.

Tissue myeloid cells in SIV-infected primates acquire viral DNA through phagocytosis of infected T cells.

Author information

1
Lab of Molecular Microbiology, NIAID, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.
2
AIDS and Cancer Virus Program, Leidos Biomedical Research Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, MD 21702, USA.
3
Vaccine Research Center, NIAID, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA; Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm 171, Sweden.
4
Vaccine Research Center, NIAID, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.
5
Lab of Molecular Microbiology, NIAID, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. Electronic address: jbrenchl@mail.nih.gov.

Abstract

The viral accessory protein Vpx, expressed by certain simian and human immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs and HIVs), is thought to improve viral infectivity of myeloid cells. We infected 35 Asian macaques and African green monkeys with viruses that do or do not express Vpx and examined viral targeting of cells in vivo. While lack of Vpx expression affected viral dynamics in vivo, with decreased viral loads and infection of CD4⁺ T cells, Vpx expression had no detectable effect on infectivity of myeloid cells. Moreover, viral DNA was observed only within myeloid cells in tissues not massively depleted of CD4⁺ T cells. Myeloid cells containing viral DNA also showed evidence of T cell phagocytosis in vivo, suggesting that their viral DNA may be attributed to phagocytosis of SIV-infected T cells. These data suggest that myeloid cells are not a major source of SIV in vivo, irrespective of Vpx expression.

PMID:
25238099
PMCID:
PMC4241569
DOI:
10.1016/j.immuni.2014.08.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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