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Toxicol In Vitro. 2015 Feb;29(1):81-4. doi: 10.1016/j.tiv.2014.08.010. Epub 2014 Sep 16.

Human relevance of an in vitro gene signature in HaCaT for skin sensitization.

Author information

1
National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), PO Box 1, NL-3720BA Bilthoven, The Netherlands; Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, PO Box 616, NL-6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands. Electronic address: jochem.vdveen@gmail.com.
2
National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), PO Box 1, NL-3720BA Bilthoven, The Netherlands.
3
Toxicology and Risk Assessment, TNO Triskelion, PO Box 844, NL-3700 AV Zeist, The Netherlands.
4
National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), PO Box 1, NL-3720BA Bilthoven, The Netherlands; Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, PO Box 616, NL-6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands.
5
National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), PO Box 1, NL-3720BA Bilthoven, The Netherlands. Electronic address: janine.ezendam@rivm.nl.

Abstract

The skin sensitizing potential of chemicals is mainly assessed using animal methods, such as the murine local lymph node assay. Recently, an in vitro assay based on a gene expression signature in the HaCaT keratinocyte cell line was proposed as an alternative to these animal methods. Here, the human relevance of this gene signature is assessed through exposure of freshly isolated human skin to the chemical allergens dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) and diphenylcyclopropenone (DCP). In human skin, the gene signature shows similar direction of regulation as was previously observed in vitro, suggesting that the molecular processes that drive expression of these genes are similar between the HaCaT cell line and freshly isolated skin, providing evidence for the human relevance of the gene signature.

KEYWORDS:

Gene signature; HaCaT; Human relevance; Skin sensitization

PMID:
25236440
DOI:
10.1016/j.tiv.2014.08.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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