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JACC Cardiovasc Interv. 2014 Sep;7(9):1014-21. doi: 10.1016/j.jcin.2014.03.009.

Impact of balloon post-dilation on clinical outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve replacement with the self-expanding CoreValve prosthesis.

Author information

1
Ferrarotto Hospital, University of Catania, Catania, Italy; ETNA Foundation, Catania, Italy. Electronic address: mbarbanti83@gmail.com.
2
AOU Pisana, Pisa, Italy.
3
Ferrarotto Hospital, University of Catania, Catania, Italy; ETNA Foundation, Catania, Italy.
4
Spedali Civili, Brescia, Italy.
5
Scientific Institute S. Raffaele, Milan, Italy.
6
Clinical Institute S. Ambrogio, Milan, Italy.
7
Niguarda Ca'Granda Hospital, Milan, Italy.
8
Ospedale Civile, Legnano, Italy.
9
Ferrarotto Hospital, University of Catania, Catania, Italy.
10
EMEA Regional Clinical Center, Medtronic Clinical Research Institute, Rome, Italy.
11
Medtronic Italy, Milan, Italy.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The aim of this study was to assess the incidence and clinical impact of balloon post-dilation (BPD) after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) with the CoreValve prosthesis (Medtronic Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota).

BACKGROUND:

BPD is a widely adopted strategy to reduce the degree of paraprosthetic regurgitation in case of transcatheter heart valve underexpansion. However, controversies still remain regarding its real effectiveness and safety.

METHODS:

The ClinicalService (a nation-based data repository and medical care project) dataset was analyzed. All patients were dichotomized according to the need for BPD during the index procedure.

RESULTS:

Among 1,376 patients, BPD of the transcatheter heart valve was performed in 272 (19.8%). In 37% of cases, it was unsuccessful at reducing the paravalvular regurgitation to mild or less. No case of valve embolization, new intravalvular regurgitation, coronary occlusion, and aortic root injury occurred during BPD. There were no statistically significant differences between the 2 groups in the incidence of in-hospital all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, neurological events, myocardial infarction, bleeding, conversion to open-chest surgery, and the need for a permanent pacemaker. The need for BPD did not emerge as an independent risk factor for all-cause (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]: 1.33, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.81 to 2.19, p = 0.264) and cardiovascular (adjusted HR: 1.48, 95% CI: 0.74 to 2.97, p = 0.265) mortality at 1 year after the procedure. In addition, BPD did not predispose to higher odds of neurological events during 12 months after TAVR (HR: 0.92, 95% CI: 0.45 to 1.88, p = 0.815).

CONCLUSIONS:

This large study showed that BPD after TAVR was safe and not associated with increased rates of cerebrovascular events, mortality, myocardial infarction, and aortic root injury.

KEYWORDS:

TAVR; post-dilation; underexpansion

PMID:
25234674
DOI:
10.1016/j.jcin.2014.03.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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