Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Zhongguo Zhen Jiu. 2014 Jul;34(7):663-6.

[Efficacy observation on fire needling therapy for moderate to severe acne vulgaris].

[Article in Chinese]

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To compare the efficacy differences between fire needling therapy and oxycycline tablets for the treatment of moderate to severe acne vulgaris.

METHODS:

Sixty cases of moderate to severe acne vulgaris were randomly divided into a fire needling group and a medication group, 30 cases in each one. The pricking method of fire needling at Ashi points around damaged skin was applied in the fire needling group, once every five days for totally 4 times. The oral administration of oxycycline tablets, 100 mg, was applied in the medication group, twice daily for 20 days, also external application of adapalene gel before sleep was adopted. The fading time of skin damage, including papule, pustule, nodule and cyst in the two groups was recorded and clinical efficacy was compared. After the treatment, two-month follow-up was performed to observe the recurrence rate in the two groups.

RESULTS:

The curative rate was 69.0% (20/29) in the fire needling group, which was statistically different from 40.0% (12/30) in the medication group (P < 0.05). The fading time of each type of skin damage in the fire needling group was shorter than that in the medication group [papule: (2.67 +/- 0.66) d vs (4.36 +/- 0.61) d; pustule: (2.47 +/- 0.57) d vs (4.27 +/- 0.55) d; nodule: (7.76 +/- 1.06) d vs (9.88-1.30) d; cyst: (11.81 +/- 1.54) d vs (14.79 +/- 0.89) d, all P < 0.05]. The recurrence rate was 46.4% (13/28) in the fire needling group, which was not significantly different from 44.0% (11/24) in the medication group (P > 0.05).

CONCLUSION:

The acne vulgaris could be fast and effectively treated by fire needling therapy, which has shorter fading time than oxycycline tablets. However, the preventive effect is not different between the two theraies.

PMID:
25233654
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments

    Supplemental Content

    Loading ...
    Support Center