Format

Send to

Choose Destination
PLoS One. 2014 Sep 18;9(9):e107719. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0107719. eCollection 2014.

Resistance to antibiotics of clinical relevance in the fecal microbiota of Mexican wildlife.

Author information

1
Division of Biological Anthropology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
2
Center for Conservation Biology, Department of Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States of America.
3
Fundación Lusara, Mexico City, Mexico.

Abstract

There are a growing number of reports of antibiotic resistance (ATBR) in bacteria living in wildlife. This is a cause for concern as ATBR in wildlife represents a potential public health threat. However, little is known about the factors that might determine the presence, abundance and dispersion of ATBR bacteria in wildlife. Here, we used culture and molecular methods to assess ATBR in bacteria in fecal samples from howler monkeys (Alouatta palliata), spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi), tapirs (Tapirus bairdii) and felids (jaguars, Panthera onca; pumas, Puma concolor; jaguarundis, Puma yagouaroundi; and ocelots, Leopardus pardalis) living freely in two regions of the Mexican state of Veracruz under different degrees of human influence. Overall, our study shows that ATBR is commonplace in bacteria isolated from wildlife in southeast Mexico. Most of the resistances were towards old and naturally occurring antibiotics, but we also observed resistances of potential clinical significance. We found that proximity to humans positively affected the presence of ATBR and that ATBR was higher in terrestrial than arboreal species. We also found evidence suggesting different terrestrial and aerial routes for the transmission of ATBR between humans and wildlife. The prevalence and potential ATBR transfer mechanisms between humans and wildlife observed in this study highlight the need for further studies to identify the factors that might determine ATBR presence, abundance and distribution.

PMID:
25233089
PMCID:
PMC4169449
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0107719
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Public Library of Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center