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Lack of Impact of Mild Obstructive Sleep Apnea on Sleepiness, Mood and Quality of Life.

Author information

1
Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA ; Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA ; Arizona Respiratory Center, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ.
2
Department of Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA.
3
Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA.
4
Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA ; Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA ; VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA.
5
College of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ ; Comprehensive Sleep Solutions, Tucson, AZ.
6
Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA ; Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA.
7
Arizona Respiratory Center, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ ; Southern Arizona VA Health Care System, Tucson, AZ.
8
Sleep Medicine and Research Center, St. Luke's Hospital, Chesterfield, MO.
9
Stanford University Sleep Clinic and Center for Human Sleep Research, Redwood City, CA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with sleepiness, depression and reduced quality of life. However, it is unclear whether mild OSA has these negative impacts. Using data from the Apnea Positive Pressure Long-term Efficacy Study (APPLES), this study determined whether participants with mild OSA had greater sleepiness, more depressive symptoms and poorer quality of life in comparison to those without OSA.

METHODS:

239 individuals evaluated for participation in APPLES with a baseline apnea hypopnea index (AHI) < 15 /hour were assigned to 1 of 2 groups: No OSA (N=40, AHI < 5 /hour) or Mild OSA (N=199, 5 to <15 /hour) based on their screening polysomnogram. Scores on their Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), Stanford Sleepiness Scale (SSS), Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D), Profile of Mood States (POMS) and Sleep Apnea Quality of Life Index (SAQLI) were compared between groups.

RESULTS:

There were no significant differences between the No OSA and Mild OSA groups on any of the 5 measures: ESS (No OSA, 9.8 ± 3.5 vs Mild OSA, 10.6 ± 4.3, p=0.26), SSS,(2.8 ± 0.9 vs. 2.9 ± 1.0, p=0.52), HAM-D (4.6 ± 3.0 vs. 4.9 ± 4.7, p=0.27), POMS (33.5 ± 22.3 vs. 28.7 ± 22.0, p=0.70), SAQLI (4.5 ± 0.8 vs. 4.7 ± 0.7, p=0.39).

CONCLUSION:

Individuals with mild OSA in this cohort do not have worse sleepiness, mood or quality of life in comparison to those without OSA.

PMID:
25232509
PMCID:
PMC4163952

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