Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Neurosci. 2014 Sep 17;34(38):12933-45. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2462-14.2014.

The frequency preference of neurons and synapses in a recurrent oscillatory network.

Author information

1
Federated Department of Biological Sciences, New Jersey Institute of Technology and Rutgers University, Newark, New Jersey 07102.
2
Federated Department of Biological Sciences, New Jersey Institute of Technology and Rutgers University, Newark, New Jersey 07102 farzan@njit.edu.

Abstract

A variety of neurons and synapses shows a maximal response at a preferred frequency, generally considered to be important in shaping network activity. We are interested in whether all neurons and synapses in a recurrent oscillatory network can have preferred frequencies and, if so, whether these frequencies are the same or correlated, and whether they influence the network activity. We address this question using identified neurons in the pyloric network of the crab Cancer borealis. Previous work has shown that the pyloric pacemaker neurons exhibit membrane potential resonance whose resonance frequency is correlated with the network frequency. The follower lateral pyloric (LP) neuron makes reciprocally inhibitory synapses with the pacemakers. We find that LP shows resonance at a higher frequency than the pacemakers and the network frequency falls between the two. We also find that the reciprocal synapses between the pacemakers and LP have preferred frequencies but at significantly lower values. The preferred frequency of the LP to pacemaker synapse is correlated with the presynaptic preferred frequency, which is most pronounced when the peak voltage of the LP waveform is within the dynamic range of the synaptic activation curve and a shift in the activation curve by the modulatory neuropeptide proctolin shifts the frequency preference. Proctolin also changes the power of the LP neuron resonance without significantly changing the resonance frequency. These results indicate that different neuron types and synapses in a network may have distinct preferred frequencies, which are subject to neuromodulation and may interact to shape network oscillations.

KEYWORDS:

central pattern generator; neuromodulation; resonance; stomatogastric

PMID:
25232127
PMCID:
PMC4166170
DOI:
10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2462-14.2014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center