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Aggress Behav. 2015 Jul-Aug;41(4):369-85. doi: 10.1002/ab.21560. Epub 2014 Sep 17.

Modeling the anti-cyberbullying preferences of university students: Adaptive choice-based conjoint analysis.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
2
Faculty of Education and School Psychology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
3
DeGroote School of Business, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
4
Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
5
McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

Adaptive choice-based conjoint analysis was used to study the anti-cyberbullying program preferences of 1,004 university students. More than 60% reported involvement in cyberbullying as witnesses (45.7%), victims (5.7%), perpetrator-victims (4.9%), or perpetrators (4.5%). Men were more likely to report involvement as perpetrators and perpetrator-victims than were women. Students recommended advertisements featuring famous people who emphasized the impact of cyberbullying on victims. They preferred a comprehensive approach teaching skills to prevent cyberbullying, encouraging students to report incidents, enabling anonymous online reporting, and terminating the internet privileges of students involved as perpetrators. Those who cyberbully were least likely, and victims of cyberbullying were most likely, to support an approach combining prevention and consequences. Simulations introducing mandatory reporting, suspensions, or police charges predicted a substantial reduction in the support of uninvolved students, witnesses, victims, and perpetrators.

KEYWORDS:

internet; relationships

PMID:
25231901
DOI:
10.1002/ab.21560
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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