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Mitochondrion. 2014 Sep;18:27-33. doi: 10.1016/j.mito.2014.09.003. Epub 2014 Sep 16.

Assessment of nuclear transfer techniques to prevent the transmission of heritable mitochondrial disorders without compromising embryonic development competence in mice.

Author information

1
Department for Reproductive Medicine, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium. Electronic address: jitesh.neupane@ugent.be.
2
Laboratory for Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium. Electronic address: mado.vandewoestyne@gmail.com.
3
Department for Reproductive Medicine, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium. Electronic address: sabitri.ghimire@ugent.be.
4
Department for Reproductive Medicine, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium. Electronic address: yuechao.lu@ugent.be.
5
Department for Reproductive Medicine, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium. Electronic address: chenqian48928@gmail.com.
6
Department of Pediatric Neurology and Metabolism, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium. Electronic address: Rudy.vancoster@ugent.be.
7
Department for Reproductive Medicine, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium. Electronic address: Jan.Gerris@uzgent.be.
8
Department for Reproductive Medicine, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium. Electronic address: tom.deroo@ugent.be.
9
Laboratory for Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium. Electronic address: dieter.deforce@ugent.be.
10
Department for Reproductive Medicine, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium. Electronic address: petra.desutter@ugent.be.
11
Department for Reproductive Medicine, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium. Electronic address: bjorn.heindryckx@ugent.be.

Abstract

To evaluate and compare mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) carry-over and embryonic development potential between different nuclear transfer techniques we performed germinal vesicle nuclear transfer (GV NT), metaphase-II spindle-chromosome-complex (MII-SCC) transfer and pronuclear transfer (PNT) in mice. No detectable mtDNA carry-over was seen in most of the reconstructed oocytes and embryos. No significant differences were seen in mtDNA carry-over rate between GV NT (n=20), MII-SCC transfer (0.29 ± 0.63; n=21) and PNT (0.29 ± 0.75; n=25). Blastocyst formation was not compromised after either PNT (88%; n=18) or MII-SCC transfer (86%; n=27). Further analysis of blastomeres from cleaving embryos (n=8) demonstrated undetectable mtDNA carry-over in all but one blastomere. We show that NT in the germ line is potent to prevent transmission of heritable mtDNA disorders with the applicability for patients attempting reproduction.

KEYWORDS:

Embryonic development potential; Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA); Nuclear transfer (NT); mtDNA carry-over

PMID:
25229667
DOI:
10.1016/j.mito.2014.09.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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