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PLoS One. 2014 Sep 17;9(9):e107212. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0107212. eCollection 2014.

Entering a new era of body indices: the feasibility of a body shape index and body roundness index to identify cardiovascular health status.

Author information

1
Department of Physiology, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands; Department for Health Evidence, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
2
Department of Physiology, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands; Department of Cardiology, Hartford Hospital, Hartford, Connecticut, United States of America.
3
Department of Physiology, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
4
Department for Health Evidence, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The Body Mass Index (BMI) and Waist Circumference (WC) are well-used anthropometric predictors for cardiovascular diseases (CVD), but their validity is regularly questioned. Recently, A Body Shape Index (ABSI) and Body Roundness Index (BRI) were introduced as alternative anthropometric indices that may better reflect health status.

OBJECTIVE:

This study assessed the capacity of ABSI and BRI in identifying cardiovascular diseases and cardiovascular disease risk factors and determined whether they are superior to BMI and WC.

DESIGN AND METHODS:

4627 Participants (54±12 years) of the Nijmegen Exercise Study completed an online questionnaire concerning CVD health status (defined as history of CVD or CVD risk factors) and anthropometric characteristics. Quintiles of ABSI, BRI, BMI, and WC were used regarding CVD prevalence. Odds ratios (OR), adjusted for age, sex, and smoking, were calculated per anthropometric index.

RESULTS:

1332 participants (27.7%) reported presence of CVD or CVD risk factors. The prevalence of CVD increased across quintiles for BMI, ABSI, BRI, and WC. Comparing the lowest with the highest quintile, adjusted OR (95% CI) for CVD were significantly different for BRI 3.2 (1.4-7.2), BMI 2.4 (1.9-3.1), and WC 3.0 (1.6-5.6). The adjusted OR (95% CI) for CVD risk factors was for BRI 2.5 (2.0-3.3), BMI 3.3 (1.6-6.8), and WC 2.0 (1.6-2.5). No association was observed for ABSI in both groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

BRI, BMI, and WC are able to determine CVD presence, while ABSI is not capable. Nevertheless, the capacity of BRI as a novel body index to identify CVD was not superior compared to established anthropometric indices like BMI and WC.

PMID:
25229394
PMCID:
PMC4167703
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0107212
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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