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Clin Immunol. 2014 Dec;155(2):188-97. doi: 10.1016/j.clim.2014.09.004. Epub 2014 Sep 16.

In utero arsenic exposure and fetal immune repertoire in a US pregnancy cohort.

Author information

1
Division of Immunology and Allergy, Stanford University, 730 Welch Road, Stanford, CA, USA. Electronic address: Knadeau@stanford.edu.
2
Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, 1 Rope Ferry Road, Hanover, NH 03755, USA. Electronic address: Zhigang.Li@Dartmouth.edu.
3
Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, 1 Rope Ferry Road, Hanover, NH 03755, USA. Electronic address: Shohreh.F.Farzan@Dartmouth.edu.
4
Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, 1 Rope Ferry Road, Hanover, NH 03755, USA. Electronic address: Devin.C.Koestler@Dartmouth.edu.
5
University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, 1600 NW 10th Ave #1140, Miami, FL 33136, USA. Electronic address: drobbins@med.miami.edu.
6
University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, 1600 NW 10th Ave #1140, Miami, FL 33136, USA. Electronic address: dlfei@med.miami.edu.
7
Institute for Immunity, Transplantation, and Infection, Stanford University, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.
8
Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, 1 Rope Ferry Road, Hanover, NH 03755, USA. Electronic address: Richard.I.Enelow@Dartmouth.edu.
9
Brigham and Women's Hospital, Department of Medicine, Channing Division of Network Medicine, Harvard Medical School, 181 Longwood Ave, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Harvard School of Public Health, Department of Environmental Health, 677 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address: susan.korrick@channing.harvard.edu.
10
Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, 1 Rope Ferry Road, Hanover, NH 03755, USA. Electronic address: Margaret.R.Karagas@Dartmouth.edu.

Abstract

Arsenic has wide-ranging effects on human health and there is evidence that it alters the immune response by influencing CD4+/CD8+ T cell ratios, IL-2 cytokine levels, and the expression of immune-response genes. We investigated the impact of in utero environmental arsenic exposure on immune development and function in newborns participating in a pregnancy cohort in New Hampshire, U.S., where arsenic levels have exceeded the current EPA maximum contaminant level of 10 μg/L. Our results showed that maternal urinary arsenic concentrations were inversely related to absolute total CD45RA+ CD4+ cord blood CD69+ T cell counts (N=116, p=0.04) and positively associated with CD45RA+ CD69- CD294+ cell counts (p=0.01). In placental samples (N=70), higher in utero urinary arsenic concentrations were positively associated with the expression of IL1β (p=0.03). These data provide evidence that relatively low-level arsenic exposure in utero may alter the fetal immune system and lead to immune dysregulation.

KEYWORDS:

AQP9; Arsenic; IL1β; Immune function; In utero; T cell

PMID:
25229165
PMCID:
PMC4309995
DOI:
10.1016/j.clim.2014.09.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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