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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2014 Sep 16;111 Suppl 4:13658-63. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1320021111. Epub 2014 Sep 15.

Team science for science communication.

Author information

1
Department of Engineering and Public Policy, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213; and gwongpar@cmu.edu.
2
Climate Central, Princeton, NJ 08542.

Abstract

Natural scientists from Climate Central and social scientists from Carnegie Mellon University collaborated to develop science communications aimed at presenting personalized coastal flood risk information to the public. We encountered four main challenges: agreeing on goals; balancing complexity and simplicity; relying on data, not intuition; and negotiating external pressures. Each challenge demanded its own approach. We navigated agreement on goals through intensive internal communication early on in the project. We balanced complexity and simplicity through evaluation of communication materials for user understanding and scientific content. Early user test results that overturned some of our intuitions strengthened our commitment to testing communication elements whenever possible. Finally, we did our best to negotiate external pressures through regular internal communication and willingness to compromise.

KEYWORDS:

collaboration; informed decision-making

PMID:
25225381
PMCID:
PMC4183174
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.1320021111
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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