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J Intensive Care Med. 2016 Jul;31(6):386-96. doi: 10.1177/0885066614550280. Epub 2014 Sep 15.

Chronic Statin Use and Long-Term Rates of Sepsis: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

Author information

1
Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Alabama School of Medicine, Birmingham, AL, USA hwang@uabmc.edu.
2
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA.
3
Department of Emergency Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA.
4
Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA.
5
Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Alabama School of Medicine, Birmingham, AL, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

"Statins" have immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects and may attenuate the risk of infections. We sought to determine the association between chronic statin use and long-term rates of sepsis events.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

We used data from 30 183 adult (≥45 years old) community-dwelling participants in the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) cohort. The primary exposure was statin use. The primary outcome was hospitalization or emergency department treatment for sepsis. Using Cox proportional hazards models, we determined associations between statin use and first sepsis events, adjusting for patients demographics, health behaviors, chronic medical conditions, degree of medication adherence, baseline high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), and propensity for statin use.

RESULTS:

Approximately one-third of participants reported statin use (n = 9475, 31.4%). During the 10-year follow-up period from 2003 to 2012, there were 1500 incident sepsis events. Statin use was not associated with rates of sepsis after multivariable adjustment for demographics, health behaviors, chronic medical conditions, medication adherence, abnormal hsCRP, and propensity for statin use, hazard ratio 0.93 (95% confidence interval: 0.81-1.06). Statin use was not similarly associated with rates of sepsis when stratified by propensity for statin use or medication adherence.

CONCLUSION:

In the REGARDS cohort, statin use at baseline was not associated with rates of future sepsis events.

KEYWORDS:

epidemiology; infections; sepsis; statins

PMID:
25223827
PMCID:
PMC5038131
DOI:
10.1177/0885066614550280
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Conflict of interest statement

Dr. Safford reports the following potential conflicts of interest: Amgen - salary support to study patterns of statin use in Medicare and other large databases; diaDexus - salary support for a research grant on lipids and CHD outcomes; diaDexus - consulting to help with FDA application; NIH, AHRQ - salary support for research grants Drs. Wang, Griffin, Shapiro and Howard do not report any related conflicts of interest.

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