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Exp Neurol. 2015 Jan;263:263-71. doi: 10.1016/j.expneurol.2014.09.004. Epub 2014 Sep 16.

Sucrose consumption test reveals pharmacoresistant depression-associated behavior in two mouse models of temporal lobe epilepsy.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Pharmacy, University of Veterinary Medicine, Hannover, Germany; Center for Systems Neuroscience, Hannover, Germany.
2
Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Pharmacy, University of Veterinary Medicine, Hannover, Germany; Center for Systems Neuroscience, Hannover, Germany. Electronic address: marion.bankstahl@tiho-hannover.de.

Abstract

Among the comorbidities observed in epilepsy patients depression is the most frequent one. Likewise, depression by itself is accompanied by an increased risk to develop epilepsy. Both epilepsy and depression are characterized by a high incidence of pharmacoresistance, which might be based on overactivity of multidrug transporters like P-glycoprotein at the blood-brain barrier. Using genetically modified mice in preclinical epilepsy research is pivotal for investigating this bidirectional relationship. In the present study, we used the sucrose consumption test (SCT) in the pilocarpine and the intrahippocampal kainate mouse post-status epilepticus model to reveal anhedonic behavior, i.e. hyposensitivity to pleasure, as a key symptom of depression. Mice were repetitively investigated by SCT during early epilepsy and the chronic phase of the disease, during which response to antidepressant drug treatment was assessed. SCT revealed long-lasting anhedonia in both models. Anhedonia appeared to be pharmacoresistant, as neither chronic treatment with imipramine in the pilocarpine model nor chronic treatment with fluoxetine in the kainate model could annihilate the differences in sucrose consumption between control and epileptic mice. Moreover, knock-out of P-glycoprotein did not improve the treatment effect of fluoxetine. In conclusion, our findings show for the first time that the SCT is suited for detection of depression-like behavior in mouse models of temporal-lobe epilepsy. Both models might serve as tools to further investigate the neurobiology and pharmacology of epilepsy-associated pharmacoresistant depression.

KEYWORDS:

Anhedonia; Animal model; Drug resistance; Kainic acid; Pilocarpine

PMID:
25220610
DOI:
10.1016/j.expneurol.2014.09.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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