Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Nat Rev Microbiol. 2014 Dec;12(12):841-50. doi: 10.1038/nrmicro3331. Epub 2014 Sep 15.

Reductive genome evolution at both ends of the bacterial population size spectrum.

Author information

1
1] Université Lyon 1, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Laboratoire de Biomtrie et Biologie volutive (LBBE), UMR5558, F-69622, France. [2] Université de Lyon, CNRS, French Institute for Research in Computer Science and Automation (INRIA), Institut National des Sciences Appliquées (INSA) de Lyon, Laboratoire d'Informatique en Images et Systèmes d'Information (LIRIS), UMR5205, F-69621, France.
2
Université Lyon 1, INRIA, CNRS, LIRIS, UMR5205, F-69622, France.
3
Université Lyon 1, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Laboratoire de Biomtrie et Biologie volutive (LBBE), UMR5558, F-69622, France.

Abstract

Bacterial genomes show substantial variations in size. The smallest bacterial genomes are those of endocellular symbionts of eukaryotic hosts, which have undergone massive genome reduction and show patterns that are consistent with the degenerative processes that are predicted to occur in species with small effective population sizes. However, similar genome reduction is found in some free-living marine cyanobacteria that are characterized by extremely large populations. In this Opinion article, we discuss the different hypotheses that have been proposed to account for this reductive genome evolution at both ends of the bacterial population size spectrum.

PMID:
25220308
DOI:
10.1038/nrmicro3331
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group
Loading ...
Support Center