Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Hear Res. 2015 Apr;322:171-9. doi: 10.1016/j.heares.2014.09.002. Epub 2014 Sep 16.

What can we expect of normally-developing children implanted at a young age with respect to their auditory, linguistic and cognitive skills?

Author information

1
KU Leuven - University of Leuven, Dept Neurosciences, Experimental Oto-rhino-laryngology, Herestraat 49, Bus 721, Leuven, Belgium. Electronic address: astrid.vanwieringen@med.kuleuven.be.
2
KU Leuven - University of Leuven, Dept Neurosciences, Experimental Oto-rhino-laryngology, Herestraat 49, Bus 721, Leuven, Belgium.

Abstract

As a result of neonatal hearing screening and subsequent early cochlear implantation (CI) profoundly deaf children have access to important information to process auditory signals and master spoken language skills at a young age. Nevertheless, auditory, linguistic and cognitive outcome measures still reveal great variability in individual achievements: some children with CI(s) perform within normal limits, while others lag behind. Understanding the causes of this variation would allow clinicians to offer better prognoses to CI candidates and efficient follow-up and rehabilitation. This paper summarizes what we can expect of normally developing children with CI(s) with regard to spoken language, bilateral and binaural auditory perception, speech perception and cognitive skills. Predictive factors of performance and factors influencing variability are presented, as well as some novel data on cognitive functioning and speech perception in quiet and in noise. Subsequently, we discuss technical and non-technical issues which should be considered in the future in order to optimally guide the child with profound hearing difficulties. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled <Lasker Award>.

PMID:
25219955
DOI:
10.1016/j.heares.2014.09.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center