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Psychiatry Res. 2014 Dec 30;220(3):784-91. doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2014.08.052. Epub 2014 Sep 3.

Aerobic fitness and body mass index in individuals with schizophrenia: Implications for neurocognition and daily functioning.

Author information

1
Division of Cognitive Neuroscience, Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA; New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY, USA. Electronic address: kimhyda@nyspi.columbia.edu.
2
Division of Cognitive Neuroscience, Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA.
3
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine/Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY, USA.
4
Department of Rehabilitation & Regenerative Medicine, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA; Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.
5
Division of Cognitive Neuroscience, Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA; New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY, USA.
6
New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY, USA.
7
New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY, USA; Division of Behavioral Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.

Abstract

Previous reports indicate that among healthy individuals low aerobic fitness (AF) and high body-mass index (BMI) predict poor neurocognition and daily-functioning. It is unknown whether these associations extend to disorders characterized by poor neurocognition, such as schizophrenia. Therefore, we compared AF and BMI in individuals with schizophrenia and non-clinical controls, and then within the schizophrenia group we examined the links between AF, BMI, neurocognition and daily-functioning. Thirty-two individuals with schizophrenia and 64 gender- and age-matched controls completed assessments of AF (indexed by VO2max) and BMI. The former also completed measures of neurocognition, daily-functioning and physical activity. The schizophrenia group displayed significantly lower AF and higher BMI. In the schizophrenia group, AF was significantly correlated with overall neurocognition (r=0.57), along with executive functioning, working memory, social cognition, and processing speed. A hierarchical regression analysis indicated that AF accounted for 22% of the neurocognition variance. Furthermore, AF was significantly correlated with overall daily-functioning (r=0.46). In contrast, BMI displayed significant inverse correlations with neurocognition, but no associations to daily-functioning. AF was significantly correlated physical activity. The authors discuss the potential use of AF-enhancing interventions to improve neurocognitive and daily-functioning in schizophrenia, along with putative neurobiological mechanisms underlying these links, including Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor.

KEYWORDS:

Aerobic fitness; Body mass index; Daily functioning; Neurocognition; Schizophrenia

PMID:
25219618
PMCID:
PMC4258141
DOI:
10.1016/j.psychres.2014.08.052
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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