Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2015 Mar;212(3):312.e1-8. doi: 10.1016/j.ajog.2014.09.003. Epub 2014 Sep 9.

Contraceptive continuation in Hispanic women.

Author information

1
Division of Clinical Research, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO.
2
Division of Clinical Research, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO. Electronic address: peipertj@wustl.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of Hispanic ethnicity on the continuation and satisfaction of reversible contraceptive methods.

STUDY DESIGN:

We analyzed 12 months of data that were collected from 7913 participants in the Contraceptive CHOICE Project. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were used to estimate continuation, and Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the risk of discontinuation.

RESULTS:

Hispanic women were more likely to choose a long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) method compared with non-Hispanic black and non-Hispanic white women (80%, 73%, and 75%, respectively; P < .05). The 12-month continuation rates were higher for LARC methods than combined hormonal methods for all race/ethnicity (Hispanic women, 87% vs 40%; non-Hispanic black women, 85% vs 46%; non-Hispanic white women, 87% vs 56%). There was no statistical difference in discontinuation of LARC methods at 12 months. Eighty percent of LARC users reported high satisfaction levels at 12 months, regardless of race/ethnicity.

CONCLUSION:

Hispanic women in the Contraceptive CHOICE Project experienced high continuation and satisfaction for LARC methods, similar to women of other ethnicities.

KEYWORDS:

continuation; ethnicity; long-acting reversible contraception; race

Comment in

PMID:
25218956
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajog.2014.09.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center