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Curr Opin Neurobiol. 2015 Feb;30:24-30. doi: 10.1016/j.conb.2014.08.013. Epub 2014 Sep 15.

Depression: from psychopathology to pathophysiology.

Author information

1
INSERM 930 & Université François Rabelais, F 37300 Tours, France. Electronic address: catherine.belzung@univ-tours.fr.
2
Psychology Department, Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea SA2 8PP, UK.
3
Department of Psychology, Université catholique de Louvain, B 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium.

Abstract

Major depression is a psychiatric disorder with high prevalence. Both specialists in cognitive psychopathology and neurobiologists have proposed explanations of the process/systems that exhibit altered functioning during this disorder. Psychological processes that are dysfunctional in depressed patients include alterations in self-referential schemas, cognitive biases, ruminations and processing mode (over-general versus concrete). These cognitive processes are associated with altered function of specific brain systems, including prefrontal areas and cingulate cortex (both involved in self-referential processes and rumination), amygdala (cognitive bias), lateral habenula (cognitive bias) and hippocampus (cognitive bias and overgeneral processing). This review aims to present a coherent view integrating these two approaches in a unique model.

PMID:
25218233
DOI:
10.1016/j.conb.2014.08.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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