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Alzheimers Dement. 2015 Mar;11(3):249-57.e1. doi: 10.1016/j.jalz.2014.07.001. Epub 2014 Sep 10.

Plasma amyloid-β and risk of Alzheimer's disease in the Framingham Heart Study.

Author information

1
The Framingham Heart Study, Framingham, MA, USA; Department of Neurology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: vchourak@bu.edu.
2
The Framingham Heart Study, Framingham, MA, USA; Department of Neurology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Biostatistics, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
3
Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, USA.
4
The Framingham Heart Study, Framingham, MA, USA; Department of Biostatistics, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
5
The Framingham Heart Study, Framingham, MA, USA; Department of Neurology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA.
6
Clinical Memory Research Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
7
Neuropsychiatric Epidemiology Research Unit, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
8
Inserm UMR 744, Lille, France; Université Lille Nord de France, Lille, France; Institut Pasteur de Lille, Lille, France.
9
Laboratory of Epidemiology and Population Sciences, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Aging, Bethesda, MD, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Plasma amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide levels have been examined as a low-cost accessible marker for risk of incident Alzheimer's disease (AD) and dementia, but results have varied between studies. We reassessed these associations in one of the largest, prospective, community-based studies to date.

METHODS:

A total of 2189 dementia-free, Framingham Study participants aged >60 years (mean age, 72 ± 8 years; 56% women) had plasma Aβ1-42 and Aβ1-40 measured and were followed prospectively (mean, 7.6 ± 3.0 years) for dementia/AD.

RESULTS:

Increased plasma Aβ1-42 levels were associated with lower risk of dementia (Aβ1-42: hazard ratio [HR] = 0.80 [0.71‒0.90], P < .001; Aβ1-42-to-Aβ1-40 ratio: HR = 0.86 [0.76‒0.98], P = .027) and AD (Aβ1-42: HR = 0.79 [0.69‒0.90], P < .001; Aβ1-42-to-Aβ1-40 ratio: HR = 0.83 [0.72‒0.96], P = .012).

CONCLUSION:

Our results suggest that lower plasma Aβ levels are associated with risk of incident AD and dementia. They encourage further evaluation of plasma Aβ levels as a biomarker for risk of developing clinical AD and dementia.

KEYWORDS:

Aβ peptides; Epidemiology; Framingham Heart Study; Incident Alzheimer's disease; Incident dementia; Meta-analysis; Plasma biomarker

PMID:
25217292
PMCID:
PMC4362883
DOI:
10.1016/j.jalz.2014.07.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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