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Mediators Inflamm. 2014;2014:162021. doi: 10.1155/2014/162021. Epub 2014 Aug 17.

Evidence for the gut microbiota short-chain fatty acids as key pathophysiological molecules improving diabetes.

Author information

1
First Clinic of Internal Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Genoa, IRCCS Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria San Martino, 6 Viale Benedetto XV, 16143 Genoa, Italy.
2
First Clinic of Internal Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Genoa, IRCCS Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria San Martino, 6 Viale Benedetto XV, 16143 Genoa, Italy ; Division of Cardiology, Foundation for Medical Researches, Department of Medical Specialties, Geneva University Hospitals, 64 Avenue de la Roseraie, 1211 Geneva, Switzerland ; Division of Laboratory Medicine, Department of Genetics and Laboratory Medicine, Geneva University Hospitals, 4 Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil, 1205 Geneva, Switzerland.

Abstract

In type 2 diabetes, hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, increased inflammation, and oxidative stress were shown to be associated with the progressive deterioration of beta-cell function and mass. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) are organic fatty acids produced in the distal gut by bacterial fermentation of macrofibrous material that might improve type 2 diabetes features. Their main beneficial activities were identified in the decrease of serum levels of glucose, insulin resistance as well as inflammation, and increase in protective Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion. In this review, we updated evidence on the effects of SCFAs potentially improving metabolic control in type 2 diabetes.

PMID:
25214711
PMCID:
PMC4151858
DOI:
10.1155/2014/162021
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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